In his new e-publication The Sacred Curse Simon Southerton employs the latest genetic research into Native American and Polynesian origins to dismantle the Book of Mormon claim that Lamanites are among the ancestors of either population. A geneticist, and former Latter-day Saint bishop, the author aptly presents the Book of Mormon’s historical claims, problems undermining them, recent apologetics, official essay, and pseudoscience alongside the science of DNA genealogy and Indigenous perspectives on Mormon racism and colonialism. The result is currently the most accessible and succinct scientific refutation of Mormonism’s Lamanite mythology. 

Thomas Murphy
PhD, University of Washington
  


In his newest book, The Sacred Curse, Simon Southerton tells it like it is. He is a savior to those of us, native people, who have always loathed the Lamanite myth and its dangerous implications but lacked the theoretical and technological arguments to counter it. He exposes the delusional pathways of the apologists as they continue to manipulate the past to their liking; even employing schoolyard-bullying tactics to discredit their critics. As with Losing a Lost Tribe, Southerton continues to apply the pressure needed to destroy a myth that has long caused so much trauma to the mainland tribes, my people, and so many others. It is time the curse myth was stopped!   

Forrest Cuch
Former Director of Indian Affairs, Utah


Southerton expertly confronts the racism within the Lamanite myth, the importance of genetics and facts, and the ongoing harmful appropriation of Indigenous ancestry. These incorrect teachings continue to impact living people, making Southerton’s book an important contemporary addition to this topic.

Sarah Newcomb
Tsimshian Tribe of the First Nations

Owner of the Lamanite Truth website


In my many and varied studies of Mormon History, it is the science of DNA and Genetics that excites me most. It ties together incontrovertibly the more than 100 years of archaeological, anthropological and other science and humanities based evidences against the claimed historicity of the Book of Mormon. I love the way that Science always challenges itself and continues to look at the evidence.

This new book, “A Sacred Curse” by Simon Southerton, opens an even greater field of evidence against the claimed historicity of the Book of Mormon as a so-called ‘true history’. This book lays out with great skill and passion a wide field of varied topics showing not only the great fraud perpetrated over more than 200 years by Joseph Smith and subsequent leaders of the LDS Church, but it also outlines the great curse that has been placed at the feet of a proud people. These people are NOT Lamanites or Nephites they are the native American Indians, The Maori, Polynesian peoples and their wide family of tribal connections throughout history.

I was a member of the LDS Church for over 55 years, I served in many and varied leadership positions at a Ward, Stake and Area/Regional level. I was living in Brisbane and serving on the Stake High Council when Simon learned of the DNA evidence that so contradicted his religious beliefs. I was told by my then leaders to stay away from Simon and his family, to not listen to or read anything that he said or wrote. That he was being misled by Satan. It took me more than 15 years to eventually read his revelatory work; Losing a Lost Tribe: Native Americans, DNA and the Mormon Church (Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 2004).

I highly commend Simon for his courage to use science to drive his beliefs, in a religion that states Faith, and the spoken words of prophets, is the only evidence required. He stands out as a man of conviction to the realities of Science.

I highly commend his new book, A Sacred Curse. Read it, test it, study it; you will not be disappointed.

Mike Perritt
Queensland, Australia


In this epilogue to Losing a Lost Tribe, Simon Southerton skilfully guides the reader through the latest advances in population genetics while applying this cutting edge science to the “dark dogma” canonized in The Book of Mormon’s white privilege narrative.  The burgeoning battle between LDS apologists on Book of Mormon geography and the Brethren’s refusal to referee this righteous riot is dramatically depicted by the author’s personal reminiscence not previously published.

Distilling the details of DNA science into layman terms is Dr. Southerton’s talent while providing the more investigative reader with ample charts, footnotes, and references including insightful consultations with LDS anthropologist Thomas W. Murphy, Ph.D.

With wise sensitivity, Dr. Southerton includes Polynesians into the mix with Native Americans thus exposing the Book of Mormon as nothing more than a 19th century white supremacist’s handbook. Southerton assists any people duped into self-loathing due to the pigment of their skin with the healing balm of renunciation of the Brethren’s “righteous racism.” 

The Sacred Curse is a sharp double-edged steel sword of science, citing and slicing through multiple layers of harmful Mormon doctrine, tradition, policy, and practice regarding the original inhabitants of the Western Hemisphere and Polynesia. His book exposes the Lamanite myth and the Brethren’s own hubristic claim of the Book of Mormon being “the most correct book…” 

I highly recommend The Sacred Curse because when it comes to busting the Lamanite myth, “who you gonna call?” Dr. Southerton, that’s who!

Steven Clark
Park City, Utah


In this sequel to Losing a Lost Tribe, Simon Southerton reviews and summarizes the ensuing decade-and-a-half of technology advances in DNA science and genetics research to categorically lock-down and weld-shut his previous finding and conclusion: the Book of Mormon is a tall tale featuring imaginary characters who never existed doing things that never happened.

Dr. Southerton’s thoroughly researched and documented distillation of genetics esoterica for his lay audience serves to “lead the horse” to the Waters of Mormon (Mosiah 18:4-6) for a drink of inescapable fact and truth. Only those stubborn steeds who treasure their own faith above scientifically proven fact will refuse to wake up and smell (or better yet, drink) the coffee after reading The Sacred Curse.  

In addition to the compelling (if not stunning) total absence of the tiniest shred of DNA evidence to support a non-fiction Book of Mormon in its self-proclaimed timeline, The Sacred Curse also reviews the human cost to those Lamanites who unfortunately believed the scripture-toting LDS missionaries peddling an egregiously counterfeit, totally fake transmogrification of Native American ancestry and culture. Robbing Lamanites of any opportunity to discover and appreciate their very own genetic heritage and ancestry is tantamount to brainwashing people into believing they are literal descendants of the Tooth Fairy. 

The Sacred Curse also overviews the pretzel-brain tap-dancing of Book of Mormon apologists forced to double down with even worse tortuous and twisting convolutions of cognitive insult now required to maintain a dangling shred of hope to rescue the precious Book of Mormon from being officially removed to the 19th Century Fiction stacks in the library.

I highly recommend The Sacred Curse, regardless of whether you are a thirsty horse or a stubborn … tapir.

Gary C,
McMinnville, Oregon